CHEESE NOTES

High-res This week’s cheese over at The Daily Meal is Chimay, a classic Belgian Trappist-style beer-washed cheese, washed with the beer of the same name (the photo above is from my post last year):

Cheese of the Week: Chimay
To be labeled “Trappist,” the Chimay cheese is required to be made by monks inside the actual walls of the monastery, and even more importantly, the proceeds must go to help the monks minister to their community. Following the Benedictine monks’ ethos, the 48th chapter of the Rule of St. Benedict states, “For then are they monks in truth, if they live by the work of their hands.” The cheese and beer were once made in small batches entirely by hand; although the Monks now embrace modern production methods, their work is still grounded in their sect’s philosophical traditions.
Chimay cheese is made from pasteurized cow’s milk and then carefully washed in the Chimay Premiere Red Cap Beer. The washing in beer helps develop Brevibacterium linens (commonly referred to as B-linens), which give the cheese its distinct orange color and well as a bit of a strong smell. These B-linens endow the cheese with a complex flavor profile, but one that is much milder than the smell might lead you to believe. As the cheese ages, it will develop stronger, earthier flavors. At its perfect stage of ripeness, the cheese is somewhat fudgy in texture, with a slightly sticky rind that will have granular bits on it from the beer washing. A subtle mushroomy quality and big umami flavors are also trademarks. This is a bold yet versatile cheese, and can be served as part of a fine cheese course, grated on top of soup to add richness, or even melted into a savory egg dish.

Check out the full post.

This week’s cheese over at The Daily Meal is Chimay, a classic Belgian Trappist-style beer-washed cheese, washed with the beer of the same name (the photo above is from my post last year):

Cheese of the Week: Chimay

To be labeled “Trappist,” the Chimay cheese is required to be made by monks inside the actual walls of the monastery, and even more importantly, the proceeds must go to help the monks minister to their community. Following the Benedictine monks’ ethos, the 48th chapter of the Rule of St. Benedict states, “For then are they monks in truth, if they live by the work of their hands.” The cheese and beer were once made in small batches entirely by hand; although the Monks now embrace modern production methods, their work is still grounded in their sect’s philosophical traditions.

Chimay cheese is made from pasteurized cow’s milk and then carefully washed in the Chimay Premiere Red Cap Beer. The washing in beer helps develop Brevibacterium linens (commonly referred to as B-linens), which give the cheese its distinct orange color and well as a bit of a strong smell. These B-linens endow the cheese with a complex flavor profile, but one that is much milder than the smell might lead you to believe. As the cheese ages, it will develop stronger, earthier flavors. At its perfect stage of ripeness, the cheese is somewhat fudgy in texture, with a slightly sticky rind that will have granular bits on it from the beer washing. A subtle mushroomy quality and big umami flavors are also trademarks. This is a bold yet versatile cheese, and can be served as part of a fine cheese course, grated on top of soup to add richness, or even melted into a savory egg dish.

Check out the full post.


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  1. doorn-roosje reblogged this from cheesenotes and added:
    🌹 has to be Great with the Chimay Beer
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