CHEESE NOTES

High-res Dr. Dennis D’Amico taught the Sanitation & Hygiene class when I was attending VIAC, and it was without a doubt one of the most informative (if occasionally stomach-turning) classes of the whole program. Dr. D’Amico is a strong supporter of artisan and raw milk cheesemakers, but believes that the only way we can continue growing the artisan cheese movement is if we commit absolutely to food safety, sanitation and hygiene, and the planning and documentation of those practices through HAACP and other processes. As the recent Listeria-related recall at Crave Brothers shows, even the most well-established, respected cheesemakers can fall victim to contamination. 
VIAC is now closed, but Dr. D’Amico has recently announced a workshop to be offered  at the University of Connecticut on June 6th. He’ll also be offering the same workshop at Cornell, on August 27th. If you’re in the area and haven’t taken a workshop like this previously, I highly recommend it. 
Check out DairyEvents.com to learn more or register.

Dr. Dennis D’Amico taught the Sanitation & Hygiene class when I was attending VIAC, and it was without a doubt one of the most informative (if occasionally stomach-turning) classes of the whole program. Dr. D’Amico is a strong supporter of artisan and raw milk cheesemakers, but believes that the only way we can continue growing the artisan cheese movement is if we commit absolutely to food safety, sanitation and hygiene, and the planning and documentation of those practices through HAACP and other processes. As the recent Listeria-related recall at Crave Brothers shows, even the most well-established, respected cheesemakers can fall victim to contamination. 

VIAC is now closed, but Dr. D’Amico has recently announced a workshop to be offered  at the University of Connecticut on June 6th. He’ll also be offering the same workshop at Cornell, on August 27th. If you’re in the area and haven’t taken a workshop like this previously, I highly recommend it. 

Check out DairyEvents.com to learn more or register.

Check out this archival film of Camembert production, showing how this trademark cheese of Normandie was made in the 1920’s. French site Ina.fr has a number of such films, focusing on Beaufort, Cantal, Roquefort and many other French AOC cheeses. A wonderful glimpse into the past, and also a reminder that small-scale cheesemaking hasn’t changed that much, when you get down to it. 

Found at the Tumblr of Sugar House Creamery, a small cheesemaker located in the Adirondacks, in Upper Jay, NY. 

For their Green Cheese blog series, which focuses on  the intersection of cheesemaking, environmental issues and sustainability, Culture Magazine talked to goat dairy Santa Gadea, located in San Cristóbal de Rioseco, Spain. Via Culture

Green Cheese: Santa Gadea

Touted as the first farm in Europe to be 100% sustainable and organic, they are also completely carbon negative—an impressive feat for dairy housing 1,300 French Alpine goats. Founded by Alfonso Pérez-Andújar and staffed by less than 15 people, the farm is located in San Cristóbal de Rioseco and focuses on both traditional and less conventional environmental strategies to reduce emissions. Though they’ve owned the property for 12 years, they’ve only been seriously producing cheese for the last two and a half years.

I spoke with Marta Milans, vice president of the dairy and daughter of Pérez-Andújar. “My dad’s passion for nature and trees is insane,” she says. This is good news, considering that their large property is very lush and green. Pérez-Andújar want to keep as much of the natural forest as possible, and began his reforestation efforts several years ago. Milans explains that “variety is important, because that way the fauna has many more options. You create a much healthier animal.” Over 120,000 trees have been planted to date, many of them pine or walnut. All of that extra greenery removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, to which Milans simply says, “It’s a beautiful thing to do, to give back to Earth that way.”

Along with reforestation, the farm features solar and wind farms, in addition to less traditional eco-friendly techniques. Pérez-Andújar is a big fan of effective micoorganism (EM) technology. Discovered by a Japanese scientist in the 1980’s, EM technology is a precise combination of three types of bacteria—phototrophic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and yeasts. Milans explains, “In a certain combination, it regenerates soil and earth in an incredible way.” When applied in the correct ratios to manure, bacteria will feed off gases, which reduces methane and carbon dioxide emissions by 40 percent and speeds up the process of turning manure into usable compost.

Check out the full post.
(photos ©2014 Culturecheesemag.com)
High-res By now you’re probably familiar with “barnyard” flavors and aromas in cheese, but they can be found in beer and wine as well, although whether that’s a good thing depends on who you’re talking to. Modern Farmer explores:

Farm in a Bottle: Barnyard Flavors in Beer and Wine
Some call the wild yeast strain Brettanomyces a friend, some call it a foe, and everyone agrees it has the aroma of a barnyard (though nobody can agree if that’s good or bad).
An aroma like “the Feet of God.” That’s how the French poet Leon-Paul Fargue described Camembert cheese, gesturing to the olfactory rapport between attraction and repulsion. But how would Fargue have summed up the flavor of farmhouse ales and wines, specifically those with Brettanomyces, a wild yeast strain whose taste is described politely as “barnyard?”
As the craft beer movement grows up alongside an ever-burgeoning wine industry, this flavor (described by critics as “horse blanket,” “phone booth,” or “merde“) has been the source of increasing discussion and degustation. Brewers and some beer drinkers have embraced the taste of barn, while wine drinkers, despite some efforts to gain acceptance for farmhouse flavors, have held fast to their old mores.

Read the full post.

By now you’re probably familiar with “barnyard” flavors and aromas in cheese, but they can be found in beer and wine as well, although whether that’s a good thing depends on who you’re talking to. Modern Farmer explores:

Farm in a Bottle: Barnyard Flavors in Beer and Wine

Some call the wild yeast strain Brettanomyces a friend, some call it a foe, and everyone agrees it has the aroma of a barnyard (though nobody can agree if that’s good or bad).

An aroma like “the Feet of God.” That’s how the French poet Leon-Paul Fargue described Camembert cheese, gesturing to the olfactory rapport between attraction and repulsion. But how would Fargue have summed up the flavor of farmhouse ales and wines, specifically those with Brettanomyces, a wild yeast strain whose taste is described politely as “barnyard?”

As the craft beer movement grows up alongside an ever-burgeoning wine industry, this flavor (described by critics as “horse blanket,” “phone booth,” or “merde“) has been the source of increasing discussion and degustation. Brewers and some beer drinkers have embraced the taste of barn, while wine drinkers, despite some efforts to gain acceptance for farmhouse flavors, have held fast to their old mores.

Read the full post.

High-res Sometimes you get so focused on chasing the new and unusual cheeses, that you forget about the perennial classics. The Abbaye de Belloc is one such cheese, an old favorite of mine that I recently bought after seeing it in a cheese counter and realizing I hadn’t actually consumed it in quite some time.
The Belloc is made by the monks of the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Belloc in the Pyrenees mountains of the Basque region, in the Ariège department of southwestern France. The Abbaye is actually a relatively modern version of another excellent Basque brebis (sheep’s milk cheese), the Ossau Iraty. In the 1960’s the recipe was modified slightly and the cheese renamed; more recently they switched from raw milk to pasteurized. 
The Abbaye de Belloc has been involved in agriculture and dairy for centuries, and when they’re not making cheese, the monks can also be found carefully penning the calligraphy and ornate borders onto illuminated manuscripts, in the traditional manner. Cheesemaking has always been a central component of their economic viability however, and throughout France, and Europe, monasteries have often served as repositories of cheesemaking knowledge.
The Belloc is made with pasteurized milk of the red-face Manech sheep, a regional breed. Aged a minimum of 4 months and usually closer to a year or more, the rind is rubbed with Paprika during aging, giving it a distinctive multi-colored appearance, with an undercoating of red, and gray, white and blue molds mingling on the surface. The amber-gold paste is firm, smooth and elastic, with no eyes. The flavor is rich, with toasted butter and lanolin up front, and notes of caramel, hay and roast hazelnuts. 
Purchased at All Good Things.

Sometimes you get so focused on chasing the new and unusual cheeses, that you forget about the perennial classics. The Abbaye de Belloc is one such cheese, an old favorite of mine that I recently bought after seeing it in a cheese counter and realizing I hadn’t actually consumed it in quite some time.

The Belloc is made by the monks of the Abbey of Notre-Dame de Belloc in the Pyrenees mountains of the Basque region, in the Ariège department of southwestern France. The Abbaye is actually a relatively modern version of another excellent Basque brebis (sheep’s milk cheese), the Ossau Iraty. In the 1960’s the recipe was modified slightly and the cheese renamed; more recently they switched from raw milk to pasteurized. 

The Abbaye de Belloc has been involved in agriculture and dairy for centuries, and when they’re not making cheese, the monks can also be found carefully penning the calligraphy and ornate borders onto illuminated manuscripts, in the traditional manner. Cheesemaking has always been a central component of their economic viability however, and throughout France, and Europe, monasteries have often served as repositories of cheesemaking knowledge.

The Belloc is made with pasteurized milk of the red-face Manech sheep, a regional breed. Aged a minimum of 4 months and usually closer to a year or more, the rind is rubbed with Paprika during aging, giving it a distinctive multi-colored appearance, with an undercoating of red, and gray, white and blue molds mingling on the surface. The amber-gold paste is firm, smooth and elastic, with no eyes. The flavor is rich, with toasted butter and lanolin up front, and notes of caramel, hay and roast hazelnuts. 

Purchased at All Good Things.

High-res Birdseye view of a new experimental cheese, washed with Finback Brewery Smoked Porter. This is about 1.5 weeks in, with light beer brine washes every other day. You can see the pinkish B.Linens cultures developing, as well as a thin layer of white mold, Penicilium Candidum, which gets mostly wiped off with each washing, but holds on in the nooks and low areas. 
This cheese also has a good stink developing, not too strong, but most definitely present. 

Birdseye view of a new experimental cheese, washed with Finback Brewery Smoked Porter. This is about 1.5 weeks in, with light beer brine washes every other day. You can see the pinkish B.Linens cultures developing, as well as a thin layer of white mold, Penicilium Candidum, which gets mostly wiped off with each washing, but holds on in the nooks and low areas. 

This cheese also has a good stink developing, not too strong, but most definitely present. 

NYC’s best grilled cheese competition returns to Openhouse Gallery this weekend. Get your tickets now! Via Openhouse

The Big Cheesy 2014

Grab some napkins and a cold beer, and get ready to bite into the gooiest grilled cheeses in the city again (and again and again)! That’s right, ladies and gents, we are bringing back the Big Cheesy for the fourth year in a row! This tasty showdown is happening on April 12th and 13th from 11am to 7pm, with tickets priced at only $30.

We here at Openhouse have been work with Time Out New York to gather some of the best grilled cheese makers at our 201 Mulberry space for two days only, so you can sample their work and crown one of them the Best Grilled Cheese in New York City. Participants include Murray’s Melts, 5oz Factory, Sons of Essex, MeltKraft, and more. And while you’re chowing down on samples don’t forget to pick up your two complimentary Goose Island craft beers, because nothing goes better with a delicious grilled cheese than that.

(Photos ©2014 OpenHouse)

Wegmans opens affinage facility

Last year I posted about Wegman’s partnership with Cornell on a new cheesemaking educational program, and their plans to open a new affinage facility; it looks like the big day has come, as they officially announce that the caves are open for business. Via The Buffalo News:

Wegmans opens its cheese caves

Wegmans’ cheese caves are open for affinage.

The supermarket has begun full operations at its 12,300-square-foot cheese-ripening building in Rochester. Under the watchful eye of an “affineur,” or cheese-ripening specialist, specialty cheeses will be aged and finished before being sold at Wegmans stores.

The building will house a Brie room and rooms for seven other kinds of soft cheeses and washed-rind cheeses.

Read more

A week ago, I opened my mailbox, only to find a box containing a sample of a new cheese (at least for me): The Västerbottensost. This cheese comes from the Västerbotten region of northern Sweden; many online sources made note of the fact that it’s known as the “Emperor of Cheeses” among Swedes.

The village of Burträsk lays claim to the invention of Västerbotten cheese; legend has it that  in the 1870’s, a dairy maid, Eleonora Lindström, was distracted in her cheesemaking duties (some claim it was the cows, others a visit from a lover), and forgot to stir her cheese at the proper times. The cheese resulting from this accidental experiment proved superior and became the new formula, and Västerbottensost was born. Currently one cheesemaking cooperative, Norrmejerier, produces the Västerbottensost. One of the central uses for this cheese is in Vasterbotten pie, a quiche that is traditionally served at crayfish parties in the long nordic summer days of August.

Made from pasteurized milk, the 42 centimeter wheels are aged a minimum of 14 months, on spruce shelves, that are believed to contribute to the flavor. The producers also claim that the midnight sun, which produces endless days of light for pastures and grazing for the cows, contributes to the profile of this cheese.

The hard-aged, straw-yellow paste of the Västerbottensost is firm, dense and elastic, a bit crumbly, with a scattering of tiny eyes throughout. The flavor is similar to a young Parmagiano-Reggiano, buttery, salty and tangy, with grassy, nutty and umami notes. I’d love to try a more aged version of this cheese, as it was a little gentle for my taste, but it does make a good alternative to Parmigiano, as well as on its own. 

(Bottom photos ©2014 vasterbottensost.com)

High-res If you’ve got your cheese, but need a good loaf to go with it, Tasting Table's guide to the best bread in NYC is a handy reference: 

Breaking: BreadTen of our favorite loaves from NYC bakeries 
We’ve been feeling your pain. Feeling and sniffing and tasting and slathering them with butter, all in the name of picking our bakers’-near-dozen of the best breads in town, gathered here in no particular order.

Check out the full post. 
(Photo ©2014 TastingTable.com)

If you’ve got your cheese, but need a good loaf to go with it, Tasting Table's guide to the best bread in NYC is a handy reference: 

Breaking: Bread
Ten of our favorite loaves from NYC bakeries 

We’ve been feeling your pain. Feeling and sniffing and tasting and slathering them with butter, all in the name of picking our bakers’-near-dozen of the best breads in town, gathered here in no particular order.

Check out the full post

(Photo ©2014 TastingTable.com)